UA-81275160-1 Rocks at Mullion by Tracey Dyke Hart - Hart Paintings

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Hazephron Cliffs, Gunwalloe by Tracey Dyke Hart
June 21, 2019
Wreckers at Gunwalloe Painted by Thomas Hart 1871
June 22, 2019

Rocks at Mullion by Tracey Dyke Hart

£400.00 £350.00

Rocks at Mullion by Tracey Dyke Hart

Born 1870 The Lizard, Cornwall.   Died 1930 Vancouver, Canada.

Watercolour

Overall Frame size    24.5 ins (623 mm) by 14.5 ins (368 mm)

Image Size    19.25 ins (488 mm) by 9.25 ins (235 mm)

https://kerrier.org/artists/tracey-dyke-hart-works/

Tracey Douglas ( Dyke ) Hart

Born 1870 The Lizard, Cornwall. Died 1930 Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada

Tracey, the 5th Son of his Father Thomas Hart, the eminent Cornish Artist. He was Tutored in art by his father as all his children were, traveled with him to Exhibitions all over England and Wales, also to Odda in Norway, sold paintings from an early age. He lived for some time in a Hotel in Mullion, Cornwall, painting scenes from around The Lizard. Later he resided in Newquay in Cornwall and painted a large volume of work on the North coast of Cornwall. In 1910 he Emigrated to Canada Via New York. He Died in Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada in 1930

Rocks at Mullion by Tracey Dyke Hart

Watercolour on Paper

Frame Size

Image Size

Tracey Douglas ( Dyke ) Hart

https://kerrier.org/artists/tracey-dyke-hart-works/

Born 1870 The Lizard, Cornwall. Died 1930   Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada

Tracey, the 5th Son of his Father Thomas Hart, the eminent Cornish Artist. Taught by his father and traveled with him to Exhibitions in England and Wales. Painted scenes in Odda Norway. Sold his work from an early age.

Lived for a time in the Hotel in Mullion, Cornwall, painting scenes around The Lizard. Including this watercolour Rocks at Mullion by Tracey Dyke Hart

Moved to Newquay Cornwall and painted a large volume of work on the North coast of Cornwall.

In 1910 he Emigrated to Canada Via New York. He Died in Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada in 1930

Mullion Cove

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mullion_Cove

or Porth Mellin is a small community on the west coast of the Lizard Peninsula in Cornwall, England. It is on the eastern side of the Mount’s Bay. The Cove forms part of the parish of Mullion, and is accessible by road from Mullion village, 1 mile (1.6 km) away to the north east, and also by the popular South West coast path. It lies within an Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty[1]

The Cove is 5 miles (8 km) south of Porthleven and 14 miles (23 km) southeast of Penzance by sea. It is 6 miles (9.7 km) south of Helston and 13 miles (21 km) southwest of Falmouth.. In 1937, a 2-mile (3.2 km) stretch of the coast from Mullion Cove to Predannack was preserved for the nation with the help of the Council for the Preservation of Rural England and the National Trust.

The coast in this part of Cornwall can be a wild and rugged place, with strong gales. The Cove is partly protected from the winds and ocean currents by Mullion Island or Enys Pruen, which lies about 720 yards (660 m) offshore to the southwest. Occupancy of the Cove goes back several hundred years, but in the early 1800s it had three working Grist Mills, including “Criggan Mill, Mullion Mill Farm”.

By the census in 1841 the Cove had several working fish cellars, net lofts and two thatched cottages.[2][3][4][5] The Census of 1841 was the first to intentionally record names of all individuals in a household or institution.

Until the early 20th century it had a thriving inshore pilchard seine fishing industry, was part of the Mounts Bay Fishery and also had a long history of crab, lobster and crawfish fishing using traditional Cornish methods with locally manufactured withy pots.

Between 1890 and 1892 and between 1895 and 1897, a harbour of two stone piers mostly made from granite, serpentine and elvan with a concrete core was constructed with the financial help of Lord Robartes of Lanhydrock both for coastal protection and to provide support and an economic base for fishermen, local farmers and local traders at a time when agriculture was going through a depression.[6] The harbour walls were maintained each year by a local stonemason.

https://hartpaintings.co.uk

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